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Recent Success Stories

- Chrissy Metz (This is Us) to star in Will O Wisp, written by Script Pipeline Screenwriting Contest finalist Evan Cooper. Evan previously placed in the competition with the thriller Ballerina Girl. He’s repped by manager Kailey Marsh and UTA.

- Script Pipeline Recommend screenplay The Miseducation of Bindu was selected in early November for Seed & Spark's Hometown Heroes initiative, attaching the Duplass brothers (Togetherness) as executive producers. The script was written by Prarthana Mohan and Script Pipeline TV Writing Contest winner Kay Tuxford (Queen of Thieves). 

FINAL DEADLINE: November 15th - Book Pipeline

The 4th Annual Book Pipeline Competition is searching for authors with material appropriate for film or television adaptation. The winning writer will receive circulation to Lakeshore Entertainment (Million Dollar BabyAmerican Pastoral), Energy Entertainment (ExtantI Am Legend), Good Fear Film + Management, Darko Entertainment (Pride and Prejudice and Zombies), and other top production companies and agencies best-suited for developing the selected projects.

"This contest is legit. Since my book was selected, we have been in nearly constant contact discussing options for promoting the book as a film and TV series. . . . They do exactly what they say they will do and keep at it until they see the project succeed."
- Zach Fortier, 2015 Book Pipeline Winner (I Am Ray Washington)

Submit Your Material

Pre-register by December 31st: 2018 Script Pipeline Competitions

Winners Receive:
$50,000 | long-term industry circulation | script development

Seeking exceptional screenplays and pilots to connect with production companies, agencies, and managers. 

Finalists receive immediate circulation to Script Pipeline partners, in addition to the following:

• $50,000 to winners

• Personal introductions to managers, producers, agents, directors, and others searching for screenplays

• Development assistance with Script Pipeline execs

• Long-term circulation for all finalists (and select semifinalists), tailored to each individual project

Submit a Screenplay | Submit a Pilot

WritersForWriters now offering 20% discounts on mentoring consultations- Limited Space

Dave Kline (CO-EP on SNATCH) and co-founder of Script Pipeline along with his colleague Chris Sey at WritersForWriters will be taking slots for script and book consultations from November 15th to December 15th. All consultations during that period will be discounted at 20% off. To schedule a session, please enter promo code WIMSP at http://www.writers-for-writers.com/consultations/.

And we will be continuing to offer the free 10 min free where you connect with Dave or Chris to discuss what the consultations will entail or if you simply have questions about your writing. To sign up for a ten min call, please contact info@writers-for-writers.com.

The mission statement of WritersForWriters has always been for our WGA consultants and mentors to pay it forward to aspiring writers hoping to soon become WGA writers themselves.

We look forward to reading!

Best,

Dave, Chris, Fior, and the team at Writers-For-Writers

Learn more about Writers-For-Writers

Follow Writers for Writers on Twitter (@writforwriters) and Facebook for updates and news about the industry’s push towards diversity.

Script Pipeline Interview - Joshua Paul Johnson and Jamie Napoli

- Joshua Paul Johnson and Jamie Napoli, winner of the 2017 Script Pipeline Screenwriting Competition with Getaway.  

Co-writing relationships can be tricky. It’s always impressive when a script turns out so tonally consistent when there’s more than one writer involved. How do you iron out who plays what role? What’s sort of your general dynamic? It’s a safe assumption that your instincts and styles fall in line, but what are some of the challenges in writing a feature with a partner?

Jamie: I think we’re very lucky that we have similar, and perhaps similarly immature senses of humor. We’re often just trying to make each other laugh with each pass of the script. We can’t really have any ego or preciousness with our writing, because the only way this works is if we’re completely honest and brutal when things aren’t working. And I think often the biggest hurdle for us is staying confident that each new draft will be better than the last one. Writing can be a bit of rollercoaster, and the fact that there are two of us can be really helpful for keeping up our passion and momentum. One of us is always moving the ball forward.

Josh: But as far as delegation goes, we don’t have strict roles. Both of us eventually do everything. We always outline the entire story together—which can run upwards of 50 pages. Our outlining process is similar to doing “notecards.” This is the most collaborative part of our process. When that’s ready, one of us opens Final Draft and begins “draft zero.” We call it “draft zero” to remove any expectation of it being remotely good. After that is completed, we re-outline the entire story re-evaluating character arcs, plants/playoffs, and suspense. With that new outline, the other person does the real first draft. We repeat the process over and over until we have a “girlfriend draft”—the one we send out to get torn apart by our significant others.

In general, the challenges involved with any creative relationship necessitate being respectful of each other’s ideas and being able to navigate disagreements. You have to feel OK blurting out an idea even if you’re not completely comfortable with it. When diagnosing a problem we often say “we need a solution, the bad version of which is…” And so we can work through problems together without judgement.

Like co-writing partnerships, comedies, too, can be difficult to execute. But Getaway seems like it could easily hit a global audience, given the setup and attention to detail when it comes to establishing the characters. Comedies sometimes go awry when the humor doesn’t translate, or feels too specific.

Was this ever a concern? What advice would you give writers who are attempting to write something similar in this vein, as far as tone and approach?

Josh: To be honest, we never had a conversation about Getaway as it related to global audiences. We just set out to write something that we wanted to see. Our aim was to ensure it was a quick read, had an unconventional tone, and contained themes we believed would make for an interesting debate. It’s been fascinating to see the differences in how men and women react to the story. Issues of masculinity and femininity was something we felt was in the zeitgeist. I’d say that’s the most culturally universal part of it.

Jamie: We’re big believers in writing what you know. That doesn’t necessarily mean writing your life story, because every script can’t be about some under-appreciated artist with writer’s block, but rather taking the fears, neuroses, settings, and characters that you’re familiar with and blending them in unique and surprising ways. We love really desperate characters because they let us laugh at the things we find most embarrassing about ourselves. Josh and I have written a number of comedies about deeply insecure men who desperately want a woman’s respect. I’ll let you come to your own conclusion about what that says about us.

Do you typically write together, or you have your own separate projects? Is it important for writers who team up on scripts to branch out and do their own material? It seems obvious writers can have it both ways, but we see examples where that’s not always the case—in other words, where the partnership itself is the brand. What’s your stance on that?

Josh: Writing partnerships are just like any other type of relationship. What works for one team might not work for another. What we know is our collaborative process and that it works for us. Whenever one of us has an idea, the other person is always the first to hear it. Though we occasionally have differences in terms of taste, interest, and personal experience, we have not yet encountered a need to branch out.

Jamie: We really just enjoy writing together, and I think we complement each other’s skills and shortcomings. We have similar aspirations to write and direct features where we have a large amount of creative control, and most importantly, I feel like we can be a lot more productive when we’re working together. We’re currently wrapping up our first draft on our next feature, and we have a number of feature and pilot scripts on the horizon that we’re really excited about.

Read the Full Interview

October 2017 Script Sales

This year, script sales slowed down in the month of October. Misher Films picked up Craig Luck and Ivor Powell’s sci-fi spec Bios. Set on a post-apocalyptic Earth, the film will follow a robot tasked with protecting his creator’s dog. Currently, Tom Hanks is attached to star, and Miguel Sapochnik is attached to direct.

Meanwhile, Stay Gold Features and Rosa Entertainment have teamed for Heart of the Beast. The drama/thriller spec, written by Cameron Alexander, follows a former Navy SEAL and his combat dog as they try to survive after an accident in the Alaskan wilderness. Moving away from stories about dogs, QC Entertainment and Good Universe have picked up Max Landis’s horror script Decon about a young medical prodigy who is pushed to their breaking point over the course of one night after joining a team that treats the most dangerous and gruesome diseases. . . .

Read More Script Sales

The Big Sick - Screenplay

Now that we’re nearing the end of 2017, studios have begun releasing scripts for potential Oscar contenders, and one film that received early and near-universal praise upon its release was The Big Sick. After watching the film, it’s easy to see its appeal. Directed by Michael Showalter and written by real-life couple Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani (based on the true story of how they met), The Big Sick effortlessly balances comedy and drama without doing a disservice to either and touches on compelling themes along the way.

Set in Chicago, the film follows Kumail (played by Nanjiani himself), an aspiring stand-up comedian and current Uber driver, and Emily (played by Zoe Kazan), a grad student studying psychology, as their relationship starts. However, after five months, Emily breaks up with Kumail after she learns he still hasn’t told his traditional Pakistani family that he is dating a white woman. (One subplot features Kumail’s mother’s attempts to set him up in an arranged marriage, or as they call it in Pakistan, “marriage,” to paraphrase one of Kumail’s jokes.)

But soon after, Emily falls ill, and Kumail’s the only person able to come to the hospital... which means he has the honor of calling her parents (Holly Hunter and Ray Romano doing career-best work) after she’s placed in a medically induced coma. The film then follows Kumail as he attempts to befriend the parents, who already hate his guts since Emily told them everything. . . .

Read The Big Sick Script

Upcoming Script Pipeline Contest Deadlines

2017 Great Movie Idea Contest - Deadline: December 10th

2017 Great TV Show Idea Contest - Deadline: December 10th

2018 Screenwriting Competition - Pre-register Deadline: December 31st

2018 TV Writing Competition - Pre-register Deadline: December 31st

2017 First Look Project - 2018 season opens in January

Film Pipeline Debuts January 1st