Script Pipeline - Home

Recent Writer Success Stories

- Henry Dunham's The Incident at Sparrow Creek Lumber began production this month with an ensemble cast featuring James Badge Dale (Rubicon), Brian Geraghty (The Hurt Locker), Happy Anderson (Mindhunter), Robert Armayo (Game of Thrones), and Gene Jones (The Hateful Eight). Dallas Sonnier, Jonathan Brownlee, and Amanda Presmyk producing. Dunham is making his feature directorial debut.

- Writers Burke Scurfield and Adam Lederer signed with manager Drew Shenfield at Mosaic in 2018. Their comedy pilot, Big Boy, was circulated by Script Pipeline to Mosaic execs after the 2017 TV Writing Competition.

Pitch a Film or TV Idea for Development

The 14th Great Movie Idea and 12th Great TV Show Idea contests are searching for original feature film and television series concepts. Ideally, unique stories a global, diverse audience can connect with.

Accepted entries include loglines, synopses, video pitches, and series "bibles" for TV entries. Completed screenplays and pilots are not reviewed, nor are entrants required to have a finished script. You only need one spectacular idea, any genre.

For the winner, Script Pipeline provides additional development assistance to refine the pitch, or help the writer draft a polished screenplay. At that point, we circulate the material top studio producers, including execs from Energy Entertainment (Extant), Lakeshore Entertainment (Age of Adaline), Good Fear Film + Management (Rings), Madhouse Entertainment (Prisoners, The Ark), QC Entertainment (Get Out), and other major companies looking for new concepts. Note that all entrants, including the winner and runner-up, retain the rights to their submission.

Since 1999, Script Pipeline has established relationships with hundreds of production companies, managers, and agents, resulting in $6 million in specs sold from previously undiscovered writers. The Great Movie and TV Show Idea Competitions look to not only increase that total, but push worthwhile stories into production.

Pitch a Film | Pitch a TV Series

DEADLINE: May 1st - Screenwriting and TV Writing Competitions

Winners Receive:
$50,000 | long-term industry circulation | script development

Submit a Screenplay | Submit a Pilot

Now in its 16th year, the Script Pipeline Competitions seek talented writers to connect with production companies, agencies, and managers. As one of the longest-running film and TV writing contests, we focus specifically on finding writers representation, supporting diverse voices, championing marketable, unique storytelling, and pushing more original projects into production.

Finalists receive immediate circulation to Script Pipeline partners, in addition to the following:

• $50,000 to winners

• Personal introductions to managers, producers, agents, directors, and others searching for screenplays

• Development assistance with Script Pipeline execs

• Long-term circulation for all finalists

"Couldn’t have signed with Mosaic without Script Pipeline. . . . Thanks for your help!"
- Burke Scurfield & Adam Lederer, TV Writing Contest Finalists

Submit a Screenplay | Submit a Pilot

Writers may also submit via FilmFreeway or Withoutabox

Consult with WGA Mentor on Your Project

Dave Kline (CO-EP on SNATCH) and co-founder of Script Pipeline, along with his colleague Chris Sey at WritersForWriters will be accepting writers for script and book consultations from March 15 to April 15. A completed script is not required. We can customize the consults to fit where you’re at with your project- i.e. logline, treatment, script, financing etc…

All consultations during the month-long period will be discounted at 20% off. To schedule a session, please enter promo code WIMSP at http://www.writers-for-writers.com/consultations/

And we will be continuing to offer the free 10 min call where you connect with Dave or Chris to discuss what the consultations will entail or if you simply have questions about your writing. To sign up for a ten min call please contact info@writers-for-writers.com

Our Fellowships are once again open for Diversity, Female, and Indie Fellowships—To submit for a fellowship- click http://www.writers-for-writers.com/fellowships/

The mission statement of WritersForWriters has always been for our WGA consultants and mentors to pay it forward to aspiring writers hoping to soon become WGA writers themselves. 

We look forward to reading!

Best,

Dave, Chris, Fior, and the team at Writers-For-Writers

Learn more about Writers-For-Writers

Follow Writers for Writers on Twitter (@writforwriters) and Facebook for updates and news about the industry’s push towards diversity.

Film Pipeline

Seeking Produced and Unproduced Shorts - Film Pipeline Competitions

The 1st Annual Film Pipeline Competitions seek remarkable writers and directors with diverse, engaging work--the type defined by forward-thinking perspectives and unconventional yet universally appealing stories.

For produced shorts, Film Pipeline's platform is significantly different from the typical festival: selected entrants are given introductions to managers and agents for potential representation and extended promotion of their short or series pilot.

For unproduced scripts, Film Pipeline creates an opportunity to get your material made and collaborates with selected entrants from development to production.

Submit a Film | Submit a Script

Script Pipeline Interview - Jen Goldson

Writer Jen Goldson placed as a finalist in the 2015 Script Pipeline Screenwriting Competition with her screenplay Everything’s Going to be Okay. At the Script Pipeline writer/industry event in Los Angeles that summer, she was introduced to producers Jay Silverman and Bethany Cerrona of Silverman Productions. Her pitch to them for another script, a romantic comedy, stuck. It was optioned right away and produced a little over a year later. Off the Menu was released on February 6th, 2018, starring Santino Fontana (Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, Frozen) and Dania Ramirez (Once Upon a Time, Devious Maids). Jen continues to write for both film and TV, with several projects in development.

Your screenplay Everything’s Going to be Okay (aka egbok) was selected as a finalist in the 2015 Script Pipeline Screenwriting Competition. At our industry event that year, you met Jay Silverman and Bethany Cerrona. A couple years later: your first produced film. And a charming one at that. Fill us in on that journey, from initial interest to production.

First of all, thank you for calling Off The Menu “charming”—my first review!

I should add that I met three pivotal contacts at Pipeline’s event: Jay Silverman and Bethany Cerrona plus Jeff Faehnle at Nasser Entertainment. Both of these companies optioned a script of mine with the clear understanding that they were greenlit to go into production. And it happened! Jay directed Off The Menu and Nasser Entertainment produced a thriller I co-wrote with my husband, Robert Foulkes, called Snatched (starring Dina Meyer and Corin Nemec). So I can’t say enough how Pipeline rejuvenated my writing career and am extremely appreciative.

So to answer your question, for Off The Menu, I worked closely with Jay and his team, and did about three or four drafts. The last draft was a pretty solid one and got the stars attached—and then things with the script were further condensed for budget. I felt good that the script drew the caliber of stars such as Santino Fontana, who was just coming off the first season of the fantastic Crazy Ex Girlfriend, and Dania Ramirez, who was great in Devious Maids and now in Once Upon A Time. And not to mention, Maria Conchita Alonso (if you haven’t seen Vampire’s Kiss, it’s a classic), and rising young star Makenzie Moss (who played little Lisa in Steve Jobs).

Writers often wonder what their role is once the final version of the script is locked in, and it typically varies depending on the film. What was the extent of your involvement during the shoot? Were you on location? Were there on-the-spot script edits to make?

Yeah, every movie is different, and on this one, I did a set visit and everyone was really lovely. They even had my name on a director’s chair, they were very sweet and thoughtful. And they also invited me for the music composing session which was really an education for me—they had a live orchestra for the score, and the film’s composer, Dave Holden, is such a talented guy. But for most of production, I really wasn’t that involved. Perhaps things will change as more feature writers come in with a TV background (where writers are often required to be on set). I do find that in the long-run, if the writer is available and willing, it would behoove production to have him/her on set. But hey, I’m hardly impartial.

I always think it has to be such a surreal experience to finally see what you wrote on-screen with real people. . . . At the premiere of the film, what was on your mind? When did it all start to feel “real” to you?

Santino and his lovely wife, Jessica Heshberg (who’s a talented Broadway singer and actress, and also appears in Menu), wrote and performed this really fun, Doris Day type of opening number for Menu and that’s when it became really real. I kept on playing it over and over again. It’s really perfect.

Tell us about the other films you have in development, including your contest-winning script Everything’s Going to be Okay.

So Everything’s Going to Be Okay is currently set up at EMA (Envision Media Arts) with Andy Tennant set to direct. The producers are hopeful that it will go this year! So that’s been a real rewarding outcome on that front. And then I have this LA-based indie film called Rent Control that Theresa Bennet is attached to direct. That script is a personal favorite of mine. My manager, Sukee Chew, has been instrumental in packaging and pushing these projects forward. She was always my first choice to work with and is amazing. And then I’m almost done with a biopic about a famous painting that’s set in Swinging London—that script is killing me. For research materials, I’ve been working with 40 plus books, 200 articles, documentaries, youtube clips. . . I am so sick of these people! (just kidding).

You’ve written a mix of genres, including a TV pilot. Do you think the range is important? Has it made you more “marketable,” in a sense?

Pretty much from the beginning of my writing career I was labeled as a “character comedy writer.” And you know what: I pretty much stayed true to this. Everything I write has some form of humor, even the biopic I’ve been working on, though it’s a drama, I have three witty characters. I will say, as you mentioned, I have that one sci-fi pilot, but even that has humor. My least favorite writers are the earnest ones. I think it just reads false. But as for “range,” I think what’s most important is knowing who you are as a writer. A writer who thinks they can write every genre is not going to perfect any one genre. So know who you are—and that takes time to figure out.

Read the Full Interview

February 2018 Script Sales

Michael De Luca Productions picked up two sci-fi specs this month: Infinitum by Marc Guggenheim, which is described as a sci-fi love story similar to Memento, and Varietal by Adam Bloom, which is a psychological sci-fi thriller centered on a married couple. Infinitum landed at Sony while Varietal went to Universal. Legendary Pictures has teamed with LeBron James’ SpringHill Entertainment for Taylor Materne’s sports drama spec Hustle. The story follows a basketball scout who travels to China and brings back a Chinese streetball phenomenon. Annapurna Pictures and Will Ferrell and Adam McKay’s Gloria Sanchez Productions have picked up Booksmart, a teen comedy written by Katie Silberman. Booksmart follows two friends on the eve of graduation who set out on a night of fun after realizing they spent their entire high school years focused on their educations. Olivia Wilde is set to direct. Finally, Studio 8 and Scoop Productions picked up Naked Is The Best Disguise, a sci-fi spec written by Graham Moore (Oscar-winning writer of The Imitation Game). Moore is set to direct as well.

Other script sales:

- John Logan to adapt Walter Isaacson’s Leonardo da Vinci biography for Paramount and Appian Way. Leonardo DiCaprio to produce, possibly star.

- Simon Farnaby will write the Action Man adaptation for Paramount Players and Hasbro Studios.

- Game of Thrones show runners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss will write and produce a new trilogy of Star Wars films for Disney and Lucasfilm.

- Scott Rosenberg and Jeff Pinkner have been tapped to script the sequel to Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, which they also cowrote.

- Atlanta writers Stephen Glover and Jamal Olori are set to write the House Party remake for New Line Cinema.

- Stephen Chbosky to direct Dr. Seuss, a biopic written by Jonathon E. Stewart and Eyal Podell.

Read More Script Sales

Get Out and Call Me by Your Name - Screenplays

The Oscars took place over this past weekend, and Get Out and Call Me by Your Name walked away with the screenwriting prizes, for Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay respectively. Although the scripts couldn’t be more different—the first, a horror movie with a deeply disturbing commentary on racism in America, and the second, a heartfelt tale of first love and first heartbreak—both provide valuable lessons for any writer.

Written and directed by Jordan Peele, Get Out follows a young black man on a weekend trip to meet his girlfriend’s parents. Although the script begins as a humorous satire in the vein of Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, things quickly escalate, and the parents’ true motives are slowly revealed in a plot reminiscent of The Stepford Wives. Peele expertly blends horror and social commentary—it’s a movie with something to say, and the message makes the horror more horrifying and vice versa. Grounding the story is main character Chris Washington (Daniel Kaluuya in an Oscar-nominated performance), who is an empathetic center to the story. The success of a horror movie hinges on whether the audience cares about the characters, and the awkwardness of the comedic early scenes help create an endearing protagonist (shortly after Chris meets the parents, Peele wrings a lot of laughs from awkward lines like “I would’ve voted for Obama a third term if I could’ve”). Once the insidiousness lurking underneath the parents’ smiles is revealed, the audience legitimately fears for Chris and his life, which is a hard feat in the horror genre, especially for a first-time director.

As great a horror script as Get Out, Call Me by Your Name is an equally great romantic drama, though the scripts couldn’t be more different. Adapted by James Ivory (director of such classics as A Room with a View, Howard’s End, and Remains of the Day) from André Aciman’s novel and directed by Luca Guadagnino, Call Me by Your Name follows the 17-year-old Elio who falls for his father’s older male research assistant in Italy in the 1980s. Like Get Out, this story is firmly grounded in character, and the chemistry between the leads (played by Armie Hammer and Oscar-nominated Timothée Chalemet) leaps off the page—and the screen. Although the stakes aren’t as high, the scenes of flirtation and seduction build with the characters’ emotions always at the forefront. It’s a bittersweet story of first love, and the story’s larger moments, particularly a third-act monologue from Elio’s father (a brilliant Michael Stuhlbarg), feel earned because of the care Ivory, Aciman, and Guadagnino put into these characters.

So if there’s one takeaway from these two very different stories, it’s character. Strong characters and strong relationships give audiences something to connect with and help make narratives compelling, whether the story is a bittersweet love story set in the 80’s or a disturbing racial horror movie with tinges of science-fiction.

Read the Get Out and Call Me by Your Name Screenplays

Script Pipeline Workshop Notes - Screenplays and Pilots

Established in 2000, the Script Pipeline Workshop is one of the longest-running notes services in the industry, offering feedback on screenplays, pilots, and pitches for film and television. Hundreds of writers each year, from beginners to professionals, benefit from the expertise of a small, seasoned group of development execs, many of whom are active writers and producers themselves.

Any genre or format accepted. We review everything from partially completed scripts to production-ready final drafts. Writers may also request a critique on supplemental materials (such as a TV show bible, synopsis, or logline), as well as follow up with their reader with additional questions on the feedback.

"The feedback, direction, and support I received from Script Pipeline helped jumpstart my screenwriting career. Thank you, Script Pipeline!"
- Michael Miceli, First Look Project Winner

Together with our competitions, the Workshop is another outlet to funnel upper-echelon projects to an array of industry contacts and shepherd scripts into production.

*contest entrants receive a discounted rate on General Reviews; add-on notes available during registration for any competition

"Script Pipeline gives the best notes--period. Whenever I'm struggling with a project, their staff never fails to provide feedback that elevates the story. They take their commitment to "Recommended" writers, contest winners, and finalists incredibly seriously, and do an amazing job of getting those scripts out into the world."
- Greg Wayne, Contest Winner and "Recommend" Writer

Development Notes | General Review

Upcoming Competition Deadlines & Dates

2018 Great Movie Idea Contest - Special Entry Deadline: March 8th

2018 Great TV Show Idea Contest - Special Entry Deadline: March 8th

2018 Screenwriting Competition - Early Deadline: May 1st

2018 TV Writing Competition - Early Deadline: May 1st

2018 First Look Project - Early Deadline: June 1st

Other Competitions:

Book Pipeline - Opening March 15th

Music Pipeline - Opening March 15th

Film Pipeline - Next Deadline: May 20th

Script Pipeline is a division of Pipeline Media Group, LLC